Horse bean

Horse bean

  Horse bean is the most important pulses crop in terms of area coverage and total annual production .It has manifold advantages in the economic lives of the farming community in the high lands of the country .Horse bean is a source of food ,feed and cash to farmers. It also plays significant role in soil fertility .however; its share in the country’s pulse export is small.

Vicia faba, also known as the broad bean, fava bean, field bean, bell bean, or tic bean, is a species of bean (Fabaceae) native to north Africa and southwest Asia, and extensively cultivated elsewhere. A variety is provisionally recognized:

    * Vicia faba var. equina Pers. – horse bean

Broad beans have a long tradition of cultivation in Old World agriculture, being among the most ancient plants in cultivation and also among the easiest to grow. Along with lentils, peas, and chickpeas, they are believed to have become part of the eastern Mediterranean diet around 6000 BC or earlier. They are still often grown as a cover crop to prevent erosion, because they can overwinter and because as a legume, they fix nitrogen in the soil. These commonly cultivated plants can be attacked by fungal diseases, such as rust (Uromyces viciae-fabae) and chocolate spot (Botrytis fabae). They are also attacked by the black bean aphid (Aphis fabae).

The broad bean has high plant hardiness; it can withstand rough climates, and in this case, cold ones. Unlike most legumes, the broad bean can be grown in soils with high salinity, as well as in clay soil. However, it does prefer to grow in rich loams.

In much of the English-speaking world, the name "broad bean" is used for the large-seeded cultivars grown for human food, while horse bean and field bean refer to cultivars with smaller, harder seeds (more like the wild species) used for animal feed, though their stronger flavour is preferred in some human food recipes, such as falafel. The term fava bean (from the Italian fava, meaning "broad bean") is usually used in English-speaking countries such as the US, but the term broad bean is the most common name in the UK.

Ethiopia

Broad beans (Amharic: baqueella) are one of the most popular legumes in Ethiopia. They are tightly coupled with every aspect of Ethiopian life. They are mainly used as an alternative to peas to prepare a flour called shiro, which is used to make shiro wot (a stew almost ubiquitous in Ethiopian dishes). During the fasting period in the Ethiopian Orthodox Church tradition called filliseta (which is in August), two uncooked, spicy, vegetable dishes are made using broad beans. The first is elibet, a thin, white paste of broad bean flour mixed with pieces of onion, green pepper, garlic, and other spices based on personal taste. The second is silijou, a fermented, sour, spicy, thin, yellow paste of broad bean flour. Both are served with other stews and injera (a pancake-like bread) during lunch and dinner.

Baqueella nifro (boiled broad beans) are eaten as a snack during some holidays and during a time of mourning. Interestingly, this tradition goes well into religious holidays, too. On the Thursday before Good Friday, in the Ethiopian Orthodox Church tradition tselote hamus (the Prayer of Thursday), people eat a different kind of nifro called gulban. Gulban is made of peeled, half beans collected and well cooked with other grains such as wheat, peas and chick peas. This is done to mourn the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

Boq'ullit (boiled salted broad beans embryo) is one of the most favorite snacks in the evening, the common story-telling time in north and central Ethiopia. It is particularly a favorite for the story-teller (usually a society elder), as it is delicious, and easy to chew and swallow.

Ripe broad beans are eaten by passers-by. Besides that, they are one of the gift items from a countryside relative in a period close to the Ethiopian Epiphany.

Address

Ethiopian Pulses, Oil Seeds and Spices Processors and Exporters Association (EPOSPEA)

Tel: +251 11 662 35 45

Fax: +251 11 662 35 04

Mob: +251 914 70 33 34

E-mail: epospea@gmail.com, epospeajossy@gmail.com

Website: www.epospeaeth.org

Office address; Haile Gebereslassie Avenue, 22 mazoria
Rebecca building next to Axum Hotel
7th floor room # 703

Monday the 23rd. Ethiopian Pulses, Oilseeds and Spices Processors Exporters Association
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